Courses

Graduate Courses

Spring 2019

AAS 522/COM 522/ENG 504/GSS 503 Publishing Articles in Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies In this interdisciplinary class, students of race as well as gender, sexuality, disability, etc. read deeply and broadly in academic journals as a way of learning the debates in their fields and placing their scholarship in relationship to them. Students report each week on the trends in the last five years of any journal of their choice, writing up the articles' arguments and debates, while also revising a paper in relationship to those debates and preparing it for publication. This course enables students to leap forward in their scholarly writing through a better understanding of their fields and the significance of their work to them. Instructor(s): Wendy Laura Belcher
Section(s):
S01 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM T
COM 542/GSS 542/SPO 556/ENG 542 Women and Liberation: Feminist Poetics and Politics in the Americas (1960s to the present) This course aims to explore different forms that the question of liberation has taken in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 1960s, the course touches upon different philosophical concepts and poetic figures that have shaped the language of women's struggles (intersectionality, black and third world feminism, subalternity and feminist epistemologies, capitalist accumulation and "witch"-hunting, (re)transmission of knowledge). Instructor(s): Susana Draper
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:30 PM W
COM 553/ENG 546/GSS 553 The Eighteenth Century in Europe This year's topic is "Reading Characters: Clarissa in Context." The seminar considers the development of the modern novel during the European Enlightenment as a narrative epistemology of character, through an intensive reading of Richardson's Clarissa. Interpreting this seminal work in the context of contemporary British and European texts and recent criticism and theory helps us observe the relation of literary genres to pervasive ideas of the period surrounding gender and identity politics, probability, sensibility, nationalism, etc.--major trends in Western literary, cultural and intellectual history still resonant today. Instructor(s): April Alliston
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 511 Special Studies in Medieval Literature: The Medieval Poem as Love Object What do we love when we love a poem? We will explore formal and philosophical questions of form that medieval poems raise: what constitutes a poem? Is there a crucial difference between forma as beauty and forma as form? How does forma depend upon matter/materia? Aristotle says that matter desires form "the way the female desires the male": how is form the object of desire, and why (and how) is it a gendered desire? Apart from the poems below, we read theories of form and love from Aristotle to Aquinas to Judith Butler and Giorgio Agamben. Instructor(s): Donald Vance Smith
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM M
ENG 550 The Romantic Period: Frankenstein at 200: Literature, Science, Ethics 200 years on, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus endures as a literary textured cultural fable about identity, science, and narrative agency, with political, cultural, and social consequences. With the novel as our focus, we study selections from Paradise Lost (its epic allusion), Enlightenment science, and Romantic-era intertexts (Coleridge, Wordsworth, P.B Shelley, Byron), a historical analogue (Itard's Wild Boy), and contemporary polemics on the rights of woman and abolition. Also: textual genetics from draft to revision, and visualizations of the Creature, from humanity to monstrosity. Instructor(s): Susan Jean Wolfson
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 553 Special Studies in the Nineteenth Century: Poetry and the Origin of Language In this course, we read 18th- and 19th-century poetry alongside the development of linguistics. We discuss theories of language origin, Indo-European and Proto-Indo-European language theory, comparative philology, and phonetics as a proto-disciplinary tangle and think through how these movements impact our understanding of English prosody and poetry. Roughly covering the period of Hans Aarsleff's classic book From Locke to Saussure, we ask where and how historical discourse in poetics and linguistics intersected and where and how, in the present day, they intersect and diverge. Instructor(s): Meredith Anne Martin
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 563 Poetics: The Nature of Nature Poetry Making poems, and receiving them--unlike the plastic arts and the performed or scripted arts--draws upon the unexpected and emergent and involves the physiology of speakers, writers, listeners, and writers in specific ways. We could therefore consider all poetry as "nature poetry" in that poems have a relation, beyond aesthesis alone, to the boundary between the phenomenal and the noumenal. Yet in the West, as in Japan, China, and many other cultures, the "nature poem" is a particular genre. In this seminar, we explore the philosophical and historical development of "the nature poem" in English language traditions. Instructor(s): Susan A. Stewart
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ENG 565 The Victorian Novel: The Long Media Century: Victorian to Modern Beginning with recent studies of newsprint circulation, serial publication and ad copy, postal delivery, telegraphy, and phonography in connection with nineteenth-century narrative (Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, James) and moving on through the birth of cinema to apparatus theory and narratology in film and digital studies, this course will examine the intersection of narrative prose, media-archaeology, and cinema in light of such intermedia and film theorists as Benjamin, Eisenstein, Bazin, McLuhan, Deleuze, Kittler, Bordwell, Debray, and ¿i¿ek. Instructor(s): Garrett Fitzgerald Stewart
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 568/COM 568 Criticism and Theory: Fredric Jameson Fredric Jameson is perhaps the most important theorist of our age with a global readership across all disciplines in the humanities for decades on end. In this graduate course, we discuss his entire body of work, appreciating the range and depth of his thought. Jameson has agreed to teleconference into our seminar at least once, and I welcome interested students to do some advanced reading to acquaint themselves with his ideas. Instructor(s): Andrew Cole
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 571 Literary and Cultural Theory: Storytelling What exactly accounts for the power and pleasure of storytelling? This course examines both the story and the telling. Likely topics include oral and written, original and adaptation, telling and retelling, audience and address, enchantment and magic, fascination and fear, trust and trickery, truth and fiction, story and case history, and imagination and transformation. Our test cases take us from the classical tradition of storytelling in The Odyssey, through fairy tales and folk tales, to modern forms of storytelling in the wake of psychoanalysis and the talking cure. Instructor(s): Diana Jean Fuss
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
ENG 572/LAS 500 Introduction to Critical Theory: Minoritarian Aesthetics: Theory, Art, and Literature This seminar utilizes our museum's holdings to complement theoretical and literary texts that speak to the problem and promise of difference in our moment. We consider how political and historical crises can heighten attention to the aesthetic by revisiting thinkers like Benjamin and Adorno. Moving from the proletariat of the Frankfurt school, we encounter theories by contemporary scholars such as Sianne Ngai and Fred Moten that focus on the minor/minority/minoritarian as a contemporary correlate--looking to how difference has been managed and how aesthetics may push the bounds of such domestications of difference. Instructor(s): Christina A. Leon
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM T
ENG 581 Seminar in Pedagogy Required weekly seminar for all English Department PhD students teaching for the first time at Princeton and scheduled to precept during the Spring 2019 semester. Balancing pedagogical theory with practical tips and collaborative discussion, the seminar helps students meet the challenges of their first semester in the classroom while also preparing them to lead their own courses. Topics include: integrated course design (preparing lesson plans; leading discussions; lecturing; teaching writing; assessment and grading); writing recommendations; and managing students, faculty, and time. Instructor(s): Diana Jean Fuss
Section(s):
S01 03:00 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 582 Graduate Writing Seminar While dissertation seminars invite students to map the territory and the stakes of their thesis, and article workshops tailor writing for specific journals, this seminar focuses on the craft of writing. Our premise is that craft and argument are mutually constitutive and our method is deliberative slow motion, tracking words, sentences, paragraphs with care. Each week we read and critique 2-3 paragraphs of each student's prose, on the understanding that they will be revised the following week, when we take up the next 2-3 paragraphs. By the end of the term, each student should have a polished article, chapter or talk. Instructor(s): Claudia L. Johnson
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM M
HUM 597/COM 597/ENG 593 Humanistic Perspectives on History and Society: Revolution Intensive reading of texts of revolution as event, process, rupture, repetition, and metaphor. Worldwide examples considered in terms of a chain of displacements within and across historical time (C17th to contemporaneity; England, USA, France, Haiti, Russia, Mexico, China, Algeria, and beyond). Why and how is revolution different from other radical transformations such as national liberation? What are the openings and where are the dangers in the revolutionary situation, and how have both proponents and opponents of revolution represented them? Instructor(s): Zahid Rafiq Chaudhary, Benjamin Conisbee Baer
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T