Courses

Graduate Courses

Spring 2018

COM 530/ENG 520/GSS 530 Comparative Poetics of Passing: Race, Ethnicity, Sexuality The expansion of race theory from the Americas into the global scene invites a cross-cultural approach to the fluidity of identity. This seminar investigates fiction and film from the African American, Jewish American, LGBTQ, and Israeli-Palestinian contexts to broadly explore how society constructs and deconstructs race, ethnicity, and gender. It focuses on representations of passing and reverse passing as well as doubled/split identities for a wide-ranging, comparative discussion of the political and the psychological dynamics of identity and selfhood. Instructor(s): Lital Levy
Section(s):
S01 10:00 AM - 01:00 PM Th
COM 535/ENG 528/GER 536 Contemporary Critical Theories: Marx's Capital Close reading of Marx's Capital vol. 1. Attention paid to questions of translation. Knowledge of German not necessary, but be prepared to engage with the German text. Secondary readings discussed as necessary. Instructor(s): Benjamin Conisbee Baer
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
COM 537/ENG 537/HOS 537 Imaginary Worlds: Early Modern Science Fiction Science fiction (SF) writing may seem a definitively modern phenomenon, but it has a rich and varied history in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In this course, we examine early modern SF not only a vehicle for popularizing the new philosophy of the "scientific revolution," but as a space for the interrogation of competing beliefs about the relationships between humankind and the cosmos, knowledge and belief, or public and private living. Through early modern SF, we explore the self-consciously literary and poetic ways in which early modern natural philosophers worked through their ideas. No "two cultures" here. Instructor(s): Rhodri Lewis
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:30 PM Th
COM 542/GSS 542/SPO 501/ENG 542 Women and Liberation: Feminist Poetics and Politics in the Americas (1960s to the present) This course aims to explore different forms that the question of liberation has taken in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 1960s, the course touches upon different philosophical concepts and poetic figures that have shaped the language of women's struggles (intersectionality, black and third world feminism, subalternity and feminist epistemologies, capitalist accumulation and "witch"-hunting, (re)transmission of knowledge). Instructor(s): Susana Draper
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:30 PM W
ENG 532 Early 17th Century: Cultural Mobility Across Europe: Netherlands as a Cultural Crossroad We explore the transnational culture of the Dutch Republic, and pose the question of how a small, newly founded & badly governed state could play such an important role in European 17th C. culture. It takes account of the recent international revival of interest in the Netherlands & its global impact, exploring the Republic's international context in order to broaden understanding of early modern literature or culture in single vernaculars, and to encourage comparative analysis between, e.g. literary studies, history music, religion, and Neo-Latin studies. From across Europe people came to the Netherlands, which were hugely influential. Instructor(s): Jan Bloemendal
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
ENG 550 The Romantic Period: Close Reading and the New Criticism(s) in the Long 20th Century For at least 75 years close-reading for literary effects and formations, and the mid-century "New Criticism" that propelled this practice, are still influential in criticism, theory, pedagogy. Yet this tradition is known mostly 2d or 3rd hand, often by slander and parody. Why and how is close reading important? We study some of the landmarks. You may involve your own field/critical/pedagogical/ theoretical concerns. Weekly responses postings; formal essays (2 midsize or one termsize) developed from your own interests; these may involve including critically reflective close readings. Instructor(s): Susan Jean Wolfson
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 559 Studies in the American Novel: Henry James and William Faulkner This course examines the careers of America's two most accomplished novelists. Manifest differences aside, both authors are obsessed with the ensnaring effects of plot, and imagine fictional realms that are as much "designs" on the reader as on their characters. Reading each author against the other, recurrent emphases become clear: on the language of perception and the relativism of perspective; on a Keatsian dialectic of chaotic vitality and lifeless aesthetic perfection; on the morality of art and the "ethics of readings"; on the costs of education: and preeminently, on the active role of the reader. Instructor(s): Lee Clark Mitchell
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM Th
ENG 563 Poetics: Jointed Lyrics: Narrative, Bundle, Canon How do lyrics come to belong to a larger whole, whether through narration or collection or canon formation? The class considers, including from the perspective of narrative theory, some early modern sonnet sequences written in the Petrarchan tradition, as well the material history of lyric collections in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In a third and final section of the class, we consider the impact of earlier poets on some poets working in the twentieth century, as a way of thinking about official and personal canons. Instructor(s): Bradin T. Cormack
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM T
ENG 565 The Victorian Novel: Novels of Society Industrial novels, Condition-of-England novels, social panoramas, fallen woman and "woman question" narratives, stories of class conflict, multi-plot Jeremiads: all of these are forms of Victorian social fiction. We read a group of these texts alongside prose by Victorian social critics (Carlyle, Ruskin, Engels) and select 20th and 21st century critical essays. How and why did the Victorians invent the social problem novel? Were new fictional forms created in the process? What does class mean in these texts, and what does it mean to us a literary critics? Instructor(s): Deborah Epstein Nord
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 568 Criticism and Theory: The Criticism Co-Op How does the history of literary criticism have an impact on the practice of criticism today? What are the enduring central questions that critics bring to their work and, indeed, what is the essence of that work? Our seminar immerses us in these issues as we survey the critic's task from Aristotle to the New Critics. The course is designed for graduate students who would like to think deeply about their practice as critics and to explore the history of criticism as a resource for new writing. Instructor(s): Susan A. Stewart
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ENG 573/COM 573 Problems in Literary Study: The Postcolonial Family Romance The goal of this course is to rethink the project of the novel in the colonial and postcolonial world by shifting emphasis from the mimetic model of desire to what Freud called the family romance, the search for alternative worlds in the social order. The course explores how the novel's historic concern with the relation between the individual and systems of the law, family, and sexuality was adopted and transformed by postcolonial writers as they consolidated, or challenged, the imagination of the colony and nation as symbolic systems for rehearsing fantasies of innocence amidst the violence that willed new subjects into being. Instructor(s): Simon Eliud Gikandi
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 581 Seminar in Pedagogy Required weekly seminar for all Department of English PhD students teaching at Princeton for the first time during the Spring 2018 semester. Balancing pedagogical theory with practical tips, the seminar helps students meet the challenge of their first semester in the classroom, while preparing them to teach courses of their own. Topics include: course design (preparing syllabi and lesson plans, teaching writing, writing prompts and tests); grading; leading discussions; lecturing; writing recommendations; and interacting with students and faculty. Instructor(s): Joshua Isaac Kotin
Section(s):
S01 03:30 PM - 04:50 PM M
ENG 582 Graduate Writing Seminar This seminar concentrates on the craft of writing, with the goal of completing a polished piece of writing, be it article, chapter, or talk. This seminar turns to writing itself as a critical project, with the assumption that good writing is the sign and the cause for clear thinking. We also work on honing individual voices. Each week we read and workshop 2-3 new paragraphs, and we study scholars who have notably distinctive styles. Instructor(s): Anne Cheng
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM T
ENG 784 The New Modernisms No description available Instructor(s): Joshua Isaac Kotin
Section(s):
S01 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM