Courses

Graduate Courses

Fall 2022

AAS 522/COM 522/ENG 504/GSS 503 Publishing Articles in Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies In this interdisciplinary class, students of race as well as gender, sexuality, disability, etc. read deeply and broadly in academic journals as a way of learning the debates in their fields and placing their scholarship in relationship to them. Students report each week on the trends in the last five years of any journal of their choice, writing up the articles' arguments and debates, while also revising a paper in relationship to those debates and preparing it for publication. This course enables students to leap forward in their scholarly writing through a better understanding of their fields and the significance of their work to them. Instructor(s): Wendy Laura Belcher
Section(s):
S01 10:00 AM - 12:50 PM T
COM 535/ENG 518/FRE 539 Contemporary Critical Theories: To Excess Investigation of the concepts of excess and surplus across several domains: political economy, psychoanalysis, theories of reproduction, environment, literary and artistic representation. In relation to value, affect, energy, material wealth, waste, population, what is an excess? Is more synonymous with "too much"? What are the conditions and uses of surplus? What are its metrics? What are the languages of surplus? In theoretical and literary readings, we consider the parameters and complexities of surplus and excess: the concepts' internal divisions and their capacity to cross discursive thresholds. There may, of course, be too much reading. Instructor(s): Benjamin Conisbee Baer
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 532/COM 591/TRA 532 Early 17th Century: Polyglot Poetics: Transnational Early Modern Literature Early modern vernacular writers did not simply imitate classical antiquity or later Italian or French verse as if it were ancient, but traded verse horizontally and multilaterally. Languages faded into one another though proximity, trade and war. We explore this cross-lingual, transnational literary field through the poetry of diplomats, colonists, itinerant prophets and pharmacists, and the work of traveling theater companies. The Netherlands is the polyglot hub for much of this activity, but we also chart rising interest in English beyond the British Isles, and tackle how we can think of an early modern global literature. Instructor(s): Nigel Smith
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM T
ENG 556/AAS 556 African-American Literature: Sites of Memory: Black Archives in Theory and Practice Silences, blind spots, absences: institutional archives are often characterized by what they stifle, obscure, or lack. So what kind of work is done by Black archives, which do not take their institutional presence for granted and often take shape in extra-institutional sites? In this survey of Black archival thought, we identify the practices that writers, artists, and scholars have used to create their own sites of memory and meaning-making. Through discussion and Special Collections workshops, we investigate how Black archives urge a rethinking of our ethical, epistemological, and affective relations to historical and documentary evidence. Instructor(s): Kinohi Nishikawa, Autumn M. Womack
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 563 Poetics: Poetry's Nature We could consider all poetry as "nature poetry" in that poems have a relation, beyond aesthesis alone, to the boundary between the phenomenal and the noumenal. In this course, we think about nature not only as a theme in poetry, but as well as a force in its practice. We take up such issues as the non-semantic and counter-logical, theories of rhythm, representations of the invisible, the temporal, the causal, and the sociology of genres. Instructor(s): Susan A. Stewart
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 566 Studies in the English Novel: Genre Trouble: Realism and Its Others Realism, even at its 19th-century apex in Great Britain and the US, always had a vexed relationship with neighboring novelistic genres. Present-day theoretical and critical debates on realism's limits and affordances (Jameson, Ranciere, Gallagher, Moi, Woloch et al.) allow us to explore, taxonomize and theorize a half-century-long contact zone. Canonical realist fiction (Gaskell, Eliot) shapes and is shaped by sensation (Wilde), naturalism (Twain and Hardy), fantasy (Jefferies), horror and the supernatural (Chesnutt), "scientific romance" (Wells), the "verse novel" (Meredith). Culminates with realist-adjacent Modernism (Ford, Woolf). Instructor(s): John Plotz
Section(s):
S01 09:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
ENG 572/COM 590/HUM 572 Introduction to Critical Theory: Politically Red Exploiting the homonymic play between "red" and "read," this course considers the relations between political engagement and different forms of activist literacy. In what way are reading and writing a means of doing political work? Why is it that, in Reading Capital, Louis Althusser famously insists that "only since Marx have we had to begin to suspect what, in theory at least, reading and hence writing means"? Analyzing writings by, among others, Marx, Luxemburg, Benjamin, Du Bois, and Jameson, we will think of how sentences are inseparable from the possibility of mass formations, insurrectionary politics, and collective action. Instructor(s): Eduardo Lujan Cadava
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ENG 573 Problems in Literary Study: Storytelling What accounts for the power and pleasure of storytelling? This course examines both the story and the telling. Likely topics include oral and written, original and adaptation, telling and retelling, audience and address, enchantment and magic, fascination and fear, trust and trickery, and truth and fiction. Our test cases take us from classical storytelling in The Odyssey, through fairy tales, folk tales, and their contemporary afterlives. We also prioritize pedagogical practice: students team-teach some class sessions, as well as submit lesson plans and sample syllabi in lieu of traditional research papers. Instructor(s): Diana Jean Fuss, William Albert Gleason
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 796 Work:Gender, Affect, & Social Reproducti No description available Instructor(s): Russ Leo
Section(s):
S01 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM