Courses

Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2019

AMS 310/ENG 434/ASA 310 Multiethnic American Short Stories: Tales We Tell Ourselves Short stories have been used by writers to make concise, insightful comments about American national identity and individuality. Taken up by African-Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and many others, the genre has been used to convey experiences with immigration and assimilation, discrimination and oppression, generational divides, and interactions across difference. Examination of such stories deepens our understanding of America's multiethnic landscape. In this seminar, we will explore stories written by a diverse group of writers to consider the ties that both link and divide multiethnic America. Instructor(s): Tessa Lowinske Desmond
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
AMS 367/ENG 267 American Noir: Crime Fiction and Film A study of a distinctive new genre that is eminently American, distinctively modernist, and brazenly vulgar. Louche as the subject is, writers were able more directly to engage issues of social inequality (racial, sexual, economic) along with changing notions of gender construction. Such fiction continues today, but its appeal for cinema has been tremendous, and we will focus on the ways adaptation modified popular formulas. Instructor(s): Lee Clark Mitchell
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 02:50 PM T Th
AMS 406/ENG 319 AMS Capstone Seminar: About Faces: Case Studies in the History of Reading Faces What "information" does your face transmit? This course explores aesthetic, philosophical, and ethical theories about human faces as markers of identity and carriers of cultural information, in terms of race, gender and class. We will turn throughout the course to the collections of the Princeton Art Museum to consider how visual art depicts the processes through which we "read" faces. We will also think about the limits of "faciality" - i.e. at what point is a face not a face - especially alongside questions of technology and performance. Instructor(s): Monica Huerta
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ASA 225/ENG 225/GSS 224 'Too Cute!': Race, Style, and Asiamania What does a minor and shallow category like "cuteness" have to do with the abject histories of race and gender? This course offers an introduction to key terms in Asian American Studies through the lens of the seemingly insatiable American appetite for "Asian cuteness." How do we reconcile this desire with the long history of anti-Asian sentiments in this country? Why aren't other races "cute"? We will explore cuteness as racial and gendered embodiment, commodity, globalization, aesthetics, affect, and politics. Above all, we explore the implications of understanding race as a style. Instructor(s): Anne Cheng
Section(s):
L01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM T Th
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM T
P02 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM T
P03 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM T
P04 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Th
P05 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Th
P99 01:00 AM - 01:00 AM
CLA 335/HLS 335/COM 390/ENG 235 Studies in the Classical Tradition: Odysseys In 2019, is "the news in the Odyssey...still news," as poet Ezra Pound claimed? After reading through Homer's Odyssey in a variety of translations (from G. Chapman to E. Wilson), we will trace its modern and contemporary afterlives - from Joyce's Ulysses to Walcott's Omeros to Atwood's Penelopiad. To what uses has this ancient story been put, and do those uses change over time? Can a work as canonical as the Odyssey offer alternative or subversive cultural narratives? What do the ways in which the Odyssey has been translated, adapted, and transformed tell us about the evolution of translation practices and of English literature itself? Instructor(s): Katerina Stergiopoulou
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 02:50 PM M W
COM 306/ENG 440 The Modern European Novel Description; This course is designed for those 1) wanting to read landmark fictions in the modern European literary tradition; 2) intrigued by the question of "world literature" as it is posed in and by the European novel. Instructor(s): Maria A. DiBattista
Section(s):
L01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM T Th
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Th
COM 343/ENG 243/GER 343 Storytelling as Self Defense: Political Novellas Modern citizens' struggle for liberty produced a radical literary tool of defense: the novella. Part everyday life, part sudden event, these short forms gave advice to those fighting the Man: How can outcasts question authority? What is a feminist plot? Can resistance be a reader response? We will discuss and read how these stories organize, formulate, and intensify real-world arguments through fictional protagonists in examples from the Americas and Europe, esp. 19th-century Germany. Alongside key theories, we will assess how novellas clarified and complicated issues of civil liberties, politics, religion, racism, gender, law, and the media. Instructor(s): Florian Fuchs
Section(s):
C01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM M W
COM 372/ENG 303 The Gothic Tradition The purpose of this course is to analyze and understand the cultural meanings of the Gothic mode through a study of its characteristic elements, its historical, aesthetic, and political origins in eighteenth-century English and German culture and thought, its development across Western national traditions, and its persistence in contemporary culture, including film, electronic media, clothing, social behavior, and belief systems, as well as literature. Films, artifacts, web sites and electronic publications will supplement readings. Instructor(s): April Alliston, Claudia L. Johnson
Section(s):
L01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM T
P01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Th
COM 421/ENG 241 Lyric Language and Form I: Renaissance to Romantic Open to undergraduate and grad. students, this course investigates poetry and prose writings on poetry by major poets writing in 16th-19th cent. English, Spanish, and German, alongside critical texts on poetics. (Foreign language knowledge desired but not required.). Brief practica on the mechanics of poetics (meters, rhyme and stress patterns, and specific poetic forms) will be presented to assist us in our examination of texts. Figuration and representation, lyric syntax and experience, temporality, and materiality, are some of the critical subjects we will address. See prof. for full syllabus. Instructor(s): Claudia Joan Brodsky
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 202 American Short Story from Irving to Wharton An exploration of the emergence and development of the American short story from the early nationalist period through romanticism and realism to naturalism and an emerging modernism. Students will be introduced to the major themes and techniques of the writers who shaped the short story in the United States into a versatile and powerful literary form. The course also explores the aesthetic and historical values that mark the development of this genre over the course of the 19th century. Instructor(s): Alfred Bendixen
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 203 The Essay This course introduces students to the range of the essay form as it has developed from the early modern period to our own. The class will be organized, for the most part, chronologically, beginning with the likes of Bacon and Hobbes, and ending with some contemporary examples of and reflections on the form. It will consider how writers as various as Sidney, Hume, Johnson, Emerson, Woolf, C.L.R. James, and Stephen Jay Gould have defined and revised The Essay. Two lectures, one 50-minute preceptorial. Instructor(s): Jeff Nunokawa
Section(s):
L01 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM M W
P01 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM M
P02 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
P02A 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
P03 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM W
P04 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
P04A 03:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 284/THR 275 Sex, Politics, and Religion on the Comic Stage This course offers an overview of comic drama, from the Greeks to the present. We'll focus on comedy's relation to festival culture, its interest in the fluidity of human identity (often telegraphed by its deployment of disguise), and its obsession with the relationship between love and money. Instructor(s): Michael William Cadden
Section(s):
L01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M W
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM M
P02 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM W
ENG 300 Junior Seminar in Critical Writing Students learn to write clear and persuasive criticism in a workshop setting while becoming familiar with a variety of critical practices and research methods. The course prepares students to write the junior paper which is due in April 2020. Each seminar section will pursue its own topic: students are assigned according to choices made during sophomore sign-ins via a lotto system. Required of all English majors. Instructor(s): Sarah M. Anderson, Bradin T. Cormack, Russell Joseph Leo III, Rhodri Lewis, Jeff Nunokawa
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
S02 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
S03 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
S04 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
S05 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 312/MED 312 Chaucer You study Geoffrey Chaucer not because he's "olde" or "hilaaarious," nor because he taught Spenser and Shakespeare a thing or two about poetry. You study Chaucer because almost every challenge we face today--so, too, every morsel of our species-being we either loathe or love--was expressed in his works but in forms different enough to help us get out of our heads to think honestly about what beleaguers human societies. Chaucer will teach us about violence, religion, law, class, identity, sex, love, laughter, and language in the fourteenth century, and we will reflect on what his brilliantly crafted works tell us about life. Instructor(s): Andrew Cole
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 320 Shakespeare I The first half of Shakespeare's career, with a focus on the great comedies and histories of the 1590's, culminating in a study of Hamlet. Instructor(s): Leonard Barkan
Section(s):
L01 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM T Th
P01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM T
P02 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM W
P03 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM Th
ENG 326 The 17th Century: Tolerance and Its Critics The modern concept of religious tolerance emerged from the political turmoil of seventeenth-century England. But before toleration was a political concern, it was a literary one. In this course we will explore works by a diverse range of authors from this crucial century. Students will read literary texts alongside debates about toleration from the English Civil Wars and the proto-capitalist Dutch republic, and from encounters with indigenous people, slaves, and religious exiles in the American colonies. The course culminates with a reconsideration of pluralism in two important novels about the period. Instructor(s): Nigel Smith
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 02:50 PM M W
ENG 340 Romanticism and the Age of Revolution Romanticism was a revolution in literary styles and subjects, and its writers lived in an age of revolutions...American, French, and roiling debates about the rights of men, of women, and the atrocity of the slave trade, and amid, within, and across this, the vital power of imagination. Our study will concern literary aesthetics and practices in this revolutionary age. Instructor(s): Susan Jean Wolfson
Section(s):
S01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM M W
ENG 350 Literature of the American Renaissance, 1820-1860 Close study of nine authors--the so-called literary "renaissance" of the new republic--who defined a native brand of literature that would influence subsequent American writers. Our focus will be on narrative and poetic forms that signaled independence from older ideals, offering an exhilarating yet deeply unsettling transition in literary history. Instructor(s): Lee Clark Mitchell
Section(s):
L01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM T Th
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P02 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Th
ENG 356/AMS 364 Topics in American Literature: American Fiction and Film: Catholics and Jews We explore the role of religion and ethnicity in 20th- and 21st-century fiction and film, with emphasis on the contributions of Catholic and Jewish writers and auteurs. Irish, Italian, and Eastern European immigrants began to influence American culture in the late-19th century. Jewish descendants established Hollywood film studios in the interwar years; refugees from Hitler settled in Hollywood after WWII to direct and act. By the middle of the 20th century, Catholic and Jewish writers emerged as important fictional voices, a trend that continued through the end of the century and into the 21st. Instructor(s): Maria A. DiBattista, Deborah Epstein Nord
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 362 Modern Poetry This seminar explores modern Anglophone poetry in and as literary history. We'll read the work of major poets alongside their lesser-known contemporaries and critics, introducing the controversies and communities (formal, aesthetic, social, racial) that defined the literary movements loosely assembled under the term "modernism." We will query the development of a literary canon that marginalized certain kinds of poets and certain kinds of reading. We'll ask why British and American poets at the beginning of the twentieth century felt such a strong urge to define themselves in opposition to their predecessors, and to one another. Instructor(s): Meredith Anne Martin
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENG 364/THR 364/COM 321 Modern Drama I A study of major plays by Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekov, Pirandello, Brecht, Beckett and others. Artists who revolutionized the stage by transforming it into a venue for avant-garde social, political, psychological, artistic and metaphysical thought, creating the theatre we know today. Instructor(s): R. N. Sandberg
Section(s):
S01 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM M W
ENG 369 Contemporary Science Fiction/Speculative Fiction An exploration of contemporary speculative fiction, with particular attention to the ways specific texts of the past fifty years have transformed science fiction into a richly imaginative literary form that challenges basic assumptions about the possibilities and limitations of human life. Our analysis of texts will focus on both the literary achievement and philosophical underpinnings of recent depictions of imagined futures, racial and gender identity, travels in time and space, and contacts with aliens, robots, and androids. Instructor(s): Alfred Bendixen
Section(s):
L01 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM M W
P01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P01A 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P02 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM W
P02A 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM W
P03 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM W
P04 09:00 AM - 09:50 AM Th
P05 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Th
P05A 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM Th
P06 12:30 PM - 01:20 PM Th
ENG 386/ENV 386 Literature and Environment Why read literature to study the environment? How are stories, poems, or essays about the natural world--and the many ways humans are intertwined with nature--relevant to current challenges of global climate change? This course examines how writers across different periods and genres have used the tools of literature to describe, transform, and even reimagine the environment. Reflecting on the creative and ethical stakes of environmental literature, from early landscape poetry to recent "cli-fi," we will consider how literature allows writers to explore new and surprising relationships to nature, often alongside or against modern "progress." Instructor(s): William Albert Gleason
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 02:50 PM T Th
ENG 405 Topics in Poetry: Poets' Poets This is a course concerned with major twentieth-century books of New World poems and their British antecedents. We will emphasize the relations contemporary poets have with the work of poets of the past, asking a range of questions about literary influences and the "simultaneity" of the history of poetry for these writers. Instructor(s): Susan A. Stewart
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ENG 433 Interpreting Brexit Brexit is the defining problem for British culture and politics in the contemporary moment. This course will read twenty-first century British literature and popular culture through the lens that Brexit provides, as well as reading Brexit through the lenses of earlier historical, political, and cultural touchstones from the mid-twentieth century to the present. We will look at recent works of poetry and fiction alongside film, pop music, and cultural criticism of the last fifty years to ask: what is and was "Britain" in the long lead-up to Brexit, and what might it look like in the future? Instructor(s): Sarah A. Chihaya
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM T
ENG 444/ASA 444/AMS 443 Global Novel How do novels represent the global? How have new media systems and economic exchange transformed not only the way novels are produced and distributed but also the internal form of the literary works themselves? This course examines how writers register the interconnected nature of modern life and the narrative strategies that they invent to make sense of migration, war, urbanization, and financialization. Students will learn interdisciplinary methods for reading literature's potential for sociological and historical knowledge by considering how the global novel grapples with empire and what political futures it forecloses and opens up. Instructor(s): Paul Nadal
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM M
ENG 445/GSS 445/ART 457 Between Desire and Disgust: Victorian Beauty in the Pre-Raphaelite and Aestheticist Traditions Disability theorist Tobin Siebers explains, "aesthetics track the emotions that some bodies feel in the presence of other bodies." In this course, we will consider if the definition is sufficient by exploring how nineteenth-century artists and writers, and particularly those involved in the Pre-Raphaelite and Aestheticism movements, thought about and transmitted aesthetic values, particularly as such values were expressed in embodied forms. Instructor(s): Natalie V. Prizel
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM Th
ENG 446 The Novel Since 2000 The last two decades have ushered in an unprecedented era of change and reflection. From the shifting of political and cultural orders at the turn of the millennium to the global circulation of the internet, human modes of expression have developed in dramatically different ways. We will explore novels written in English from 2000 to the present that reflect on change -- cultural, political, technological, environmental -- and in so doing, consider our position as twenty-first century readers in relation to both the past and the future. Instructor(s): Sarah A. Chihaya
Section(s):
L01 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM T Th
P01 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM M
P02 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM T
P03 02:30 PM - 03:20 PM T
P04 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM W
P05 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM Th
P06 01:30 PM - 02:20 PM Th
ENV 357/AMS 457/GSS 357/ENG 315 Empire of the Ark: The Animal Question in Film, Photography and Popular Culture This course explores the fascination with animals in film, photography and popular culture, engaging critical issues in animal and environmental studies. In the context of global crises of climate change and mass displacement, course themes include the invention of wilderness, national parks, zoos and the prison system; the cult of the pet; vampires, werewolves and liminal creatures; animal communication, emotions and rights; queering nature; race and strategies for environmental justice. How can rethinking animals help us rethink what it means to be human? How can we transform our relations with other species and the planet itself? Instructor(s): Anne McClintock
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W
ENV 375/ENG 275/JRN 375 Crossing the Climate Change Divide The effects of climate change are here, now. Yet Americans are divided on this singular issue. Or are they? While media portray climate change debates as binary, fact-averse conservative denialists vs. Green-New-Deal leftists, the reality is that all Americans are experiencing changes in their own backyards. Journalist and Visiting Professor Subramanian traveled across the country collecting climate change stories told by conservative farmers, ranchers, dogsledders, evangelical Christians, and others. We'll explore why facts alone can fail and how political, economic and religious beliefs shape the climate debate for people far from academia.
Section(s):
S01 01:30 PM - 04:20 PM W